School-Community: Articles & Research

Articles and Research take 4


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Creating Holistic Partnerships Between School and Afterschool

A study of a large afterschool program based at schools in Connecticut, which identified some key areas that block school-afterschool collaboration, and suggests strategies to improve communication and collaboration.

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After the Last Bell - The Multiple Roles of Principles in School-based Afterschool Programs

After the Last Bell: The Multiple Roles of Principles in School-based Afterschool Programs

The relationship between an afterschool coordinator and school principals can “make or break” and afterschool program.  This article describes research that highlights the importance of this relationship, and of principal involvement afterschool generally, consistent across sites and districts.

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Bringing in the Community - Partnerships and Quality Assurance in 21st Century Community Learning Centers

Bringing in the Community: Partnerships and Quality Assurance in 21st Century Community Learning Centers

Because of funding criteria, many organizations, such as the 21st Century Community Learning Centers, are required to work in partnership other organizations to offer afterschool programs at schools.  However, the inclusion of multiple partners along with school-based site staff at any given 21st Century site often means that the quality of instruction can be extremely uneven. This study of 21st Century sites in Michigan examined these partnerships, and selected high-quality sites to arrive at an instructional partnerships model of quality assurance practices.

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Can We Talk - Creating Effective Partnerships Between School and Afterschool Programs

Can We Talk: Creating Effective Partnerships Between School and Afterschool Programs

After a classroom teacher became the coordinator of an afterschool program, she realized that the staff of the afterschool program and the school staff had different visions of the aims and goals of the program.  This article describes a study that explored these different visions, and ends with strategies to bring these two visions together.

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Collaboration Between Afterschool Practitioners and in-school Teachers

Collaboration Between Afterschool Practitioners and in-school Teachers

Recommendations from a classroom teacher about ways to instill and support collaboration and learning between school staff and staff of afterschool programs.

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Community Convenings for Trinity Wall Street - A Summary of PASE's Activities, Recommendations, & Learnings

Community Convenings for Trinity Wall Street: A Summary of PASE’s Activities, Recommendations, & Learnings

This report describes a series of “convenings” of community based organizations whose aim was to uncover the challenges CBOs face in working with public schools to provide significant and sustained educational programming for young people. The report includes some recommendations, including, among others, joint professional development between school day and afterschool staff.

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Community-based Youth Organizations Negotiating Educational and Social Equity

Community-based Youth Organizations Negotiating Educational and Social Equity

A case study of an community based organization and its role in negotiating social and educational equity for its students with the local school.

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Data-Sharing - Federal Rules and Best Practices to Improve Out-of-School-Time Programs and Student Outcomes

Data-Sharing: Federal Rules and Best Practices to Improve Out-of-School-Time Programs and Student Outcomes

Coordinated data-sharing between schools and OST partners can improve the quality of OST programs and provide better learning outcomes for the students they serve. The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), has consistently been cited as a roadblock for school systems and their OST partners to share student data in a coordinated approach to improve education programs and student outcomes. This policy brief seeks to demonstrate that FERPA can allow for data-sharing between schools and OST partners, and why it is a best practice to do so.

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Levering Resources to Promote Positive School-CBO Relationships

Levering Resources to Promote Positive School-CBO Relationships

While cognizant of the tensions that often arise between schools and afterschool programs, this article identifies ways that both can leverage resources to strengthen the learning experience of students.  Resources include physical resources, financial resources, social resources, and intellectual resources.

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Partnerships for Learning - Promising Practices in Integrating School and Out-of-School Time Program Supports

Partnerships for Learning – Promising Practices in Integrating School and Out-of-School Time Program Supports

In a true learning partnerships, in-school and non-school supports collaborate as equal partners to work toward a shared vision for children’s learning. This document provides a model of partnerships which can be structured in a number of different ways and involve a variety of partners, including schools, Out-of-School Time programs, physical and mental health services, and other community resources.

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Perils & Promise - Afterschool Programs on School Territory

Perils & Promise: Afterschool Programs on School Territory

While there are a few drawbacks of situating afterschool learning environments on school territory, the author presents some substantial opportunities in the daily conduct and outcomes of afterschool programs.

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The Four Cs of Afterschool Programming - A New Case Method for a New Field

The Four Cs of Afterschool Programming: A New Case Method for a New Field

This case study centers on “the Four Cs,” four areas the authors have concluded to be of special relevance to the success or failure of afterschool programs: collaboration, communication, content, and coherence. As a conceptual organizing device, the Four Cs allow researchers and evaluators to survey the strengths and weaknesses of particular afterschool programs in a structured way and to suggest changes that can strengthen afterschool practice. .

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