News

Aging Out, Stepping Up

Video: Aging Out, Stepping up

Video: Aging Out, Stepping up

James Milan entered foster care at age 4. “My childhood wasn’t the greatest,” he says wryly. “I was trying to figure out why my mother didn’t want me, why my father wasn’t there.” In and out of foster care homes and group homes, he found the Claremont Neighborhood Center in the Bronx, N.Y., — and now works as a senior counselor there with kids ages 5 through 13.

[Related: Community Programs Are Safe Haven for Foster Children]

 

“He’s a pretty cool guy,” say the kids at Claremont Neighborhood Center, where Milan works as a senior counselor. “If you hang with James, you famous for the rest of the day.”

“He’s a pretty cool guy,” say the kids at Claremont Neighborhood Center, where Milan works as a senior counselor. “If you hang with James, you famous for the rest of the day.”

New York Bureau
Milan describes the neighborhood center as a safe space for kids, with movie nights, late-night gym access, cooking and more. “There’s so much around them that’s not positive … I feel like I’ve gotta be a role model, because if you look around, especially in our neighborhood, there are not a lot of role models.”

“He’s a pretty cool guy,” say the kids at Claremont Neighborhood Center, where Milan works as a senior counselor. “If you hang with James, you famous for the rest of the day.”

James was “a little headstrong," quick to anger, says Patricia Wilkins, Claremont’s office manager and Milan’s “adopted” mother at the center.

James was “a little headstrong,” quick to anger, says Patricia Wilkins, Claremont’s office manager and Milan’s “adopted” mother at the center.

“I had seen something that maybe other people didn’t. They might have saw a smart alecky kid, a kid that might not have seemed like he was going anywhere. Maybe a kid that looked like he didn’t have any real dreams. But that’s not what I saw. I saw something that was innate. He said he liked kids … I have a lot of hopes for him. A lot of plans.” — Abraham Jones, executive director of Claremont Neighborhood Centers, Inc. and James’ father-figure.

More related articles:

Foster Care System Feels Shock Waves from Heroin Addiction

A Hole in the Safety Net Offered by the Affordable Care Act

The Maze of Foster Care and Health Care

Comments

Youth Today is the only independent, internationally distributed digital media publication that is read by thousands of professionals in the youth service field.

Youth Today adheres to high-quality journalistic standards, providing readers with professional news coverage dedicated to examining a wide spectrum of complex issues in the youth services industry from legislation to community-based youth work.

EDITORIAL INDEPENDENCE

Our organization retains full authority over editorial content to protect the best journalistic and business interests of our organization. We maintain a firewall between news coverage decisions and sources of all revenue.

DONORS & DONOR TRANSPARENCY

We are committed to transparency in every aspect of funding our organization. Donors may be quoted, mentioned or featured in our stories. Our news judgments are made independently – not based on or influenced by donors. Accepting financial support does not mean we endorse donors or their products, services or opinions…(read more)

Recent Comments

Archives

Categories

Search

Kennesaw State University Mountain Logo & Ceneter for Sustainable Journalism Logo
LOGO Institute for Nonprofit News 3 turquoise boxes stacked in "J" shape

Copyright © 2018 Youth Today and MVP Themes --- Published by Center for Sustainable Journalism,
Kennesaw State University, 1200 Chastain Blvd. Suite 310, Kennesaw GA 30144

To Top