Top Headlines 12/20

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Education

When Rep. John Kline (R-Minn.) assumes leadership of the House education committee next month, he plans to eliminate, or at least delay, Obama administration proposed measures to tighten the reins on for-profit colleges. More from Bloomberg's John

Lauerman here.

 The DREAM Act's dwindling hopes of passage during the lame-duck session to conclude the 111th Congress were officially squashed this weekend, as Senate Democrats came up five votes short of the 60 needed to overcome a Republican filibuster. Though the immigration bill is not expected to have a decent chance in the next few years, as the Republicans take over the House next month, ABC News' Arlette Saenz has this report on DREAM Activists not giving up the fight.

Child Welfare

The New York Times' Trip Gabriel explores the growing number of college students who have serious mental health problems, perhaps twice as many as just a decade ago.

The Los Angeles Times makes the case for making some family court proceedings open to the public.

Star-Ledger reporter Susan Livio covers one of the facets of child welfare reform that has stymied New Jersey: effectively handling youth who are “dually diagnosed” with a developmental disability and a mental illness.

Juvenile Justice

Henri Cauvin of the Washington Post does a nice job here of depicting the state of juvenile justice reform that will be inherited by Mayor-elect Vincent Gray next month.

Seanna Adcox of GoUpstate.com reports on a proposed bill in South Carolina that would make sexting a misdemeanor offense for juveniles between 12 and 17, a penalty designed to bring enough severity to the act that it deters kids from doing it but prevents any youth from landing on a sex offender registry for doing it.

Lynda Waddington of the Iowa Independent reports on the first, but certainly not last, resentencing in the state spurred by the U.S. Supreme Court decision in Graham v. Florida.

Star-Ledger reporter Susan Livio covers one of the facets of child welfare reform that has stymied New Jersey: effectively handling youth who are “dually diagnosed” with a developmental disability and a mental illness.