Girlhood Interrupted: The Erasure of Black Girls’ Childhood

This groundbreaking new study recently released by the Georgetown University Law Center uses comprehensive survey data to show how the perception of black girls by the majority of the public differs from that of their peers. The results show, among many other worrying findings, that black girls are perceived as being older, less in need of nurturing, less in need of protection, and that they know more about adult topics at a younger age. The report shows how these perceptions have profound implications for how black girls are treated in the education and juvenile justice systems relative to their peers of other ethnicities.

Rethinking Credential Requirements in Early Education

New America takes a look at the current state of education and skills requirements for early childhood educators. Currently many view these workers as "babysitters by another name" who don't necessarily need higher education and professional training like what is required for educators of older youth. This report argues against this misconception and lays out a framework for the proper education and training of this vulnerable workforce.