A Civil Rights Movement Grows in Brooklyn

Two meetings last week, one in a ragged community center across the street from a waterfront Brooklyn housing project, the other in a well-lit assembly room in New York City’s elite criminal justice college in the heart of Manhattan, illustrated how a fledgling civil rights movement is growing around the tactics used by police to target young people in the city’s housing projects.

Children Will Continue to Flee Danger, Expert Says

In all her years working with Unaccompanied Alien Children, one interaction in particular stands out to Michelle Brané, the director of migrant rights and justice for the Women’s Refugee Commission.

Trump Administration Could Target Central American Teens

After 18 days on a bus to the Mexican city of Reynosa, five days walking through the desert to Texas and two months living in Long Island, the fate of 18-year-old Axel Caballero of Honduras rested in the hands of an immigration judge who hovered above him inside a federal immigration courtroom in downtown Manhattan.

NY High School Students Abandon Classes to Protest Trump, Vow ‘We Vote Next’

A cold rain didn't dampen the energy of several hundred New York City high school students who walked out of classes on Tuesday to protest President Donald Trump's policies on immigration, education, women's rights, race, the environment and other issues.

Families of Inmates: A Photographer’s Focus at Rikers Island

Every day an estimated 1,500 family members and friends of those incarcerated on New York’s Rikers Island visit their loved ones. For several months, photographer Salvador Espinoza rode the bus back and forth, documenting the stories of these people.

Young People Protest Trump’s Immigration Order

Carley Moore, author and clinical professor of liberal studies at NYU, is not surprised that young people are taking the lead.

“There’s a lot of trauma right now in the classroom,” said Moore, who teaches a course on youth activism. “But students have always been activists and they will always be activists.”

Bookstore’s Closing Leaves Bronx Residents Disrupted and Nostalgic

At the end of the year, Barnes & Noble in the Bronx will close, leaving a borough of more than 1.4 million people without a general-interest bookstore. “In poorer neighborhoods, those Barnes & Nobles are a centerpiece. Children begin to understand that reading is a very important part of life by seeing other people reading,” said Susan Neuman, a professor of literacy development at New York University.