The State of America’s Children – 2014

-Full report-

Author(s): The Children's Defense Fund

Published: February 2014

Report Intro/Brief:
"In 1964, President Lyndon Johnson declared a War on Poverty in his State of the Union Address. Fifty years later, how have American children fared? CDF’s new report The State of America's Children 2014 finds child poverty has reached record levels and children of color are disproportionately poor. This is a comprehensive compilation and analysis of the most recent and reliable national and state-by-state data on population, poverty, family structure, family income, health, nutrition, early childhood development, education, child welfare, juvenile justice, and gun violence. The report provides key child data showing alarming numbers of children at risk."

Computing and Engineering in Afterschool

-Full report-

Author(s): The Afterschool Alliance

Published: December 2013

Report Intro/Brief:
"Despite the availability of well-paid computing and engineering jobs, very few college freshmen are interested in these fields -- only 1.5 percent intend to major in computer science and 10.3 percent intend to elect engineering. While there are many factors that influence what major college students choose, one of the key factors is a lack of exposure and experience during the K-12 years. Very few schools are able to offer computing and engineering courses. Although several of the more popular Advanced Placement (AP) exams are in science or math, less than 1 percent of tests taken are the computer science exam. Currently, there is no AP Engineering exam offered.

The Comeback and Coming-from-Behind States: An Update on Youth Incarceration in the United States

-Full report-

Author(s): National Juvenile Justice Network and the
Texas Public Policy Foundation’s Center for Effective Justice (TPPF)

Published: December 18th, 2013

Report Intro/Brief:
"The Comeback States report charted the reduction of youth incarceration nationwide and in the nine states for the 2001-to-2010 period. Significantly, these states not only reduced youth incarceration over this time, but also achieved reductions in youth crime, as measured by substantial declines in youth arrests. For that report, data for the year 2010 on nationwide and state confinement of youth were the latest data available. Since the time of the release of that report, 2011 data on youth confinement have become available from the U.S. Justice Department’s (USDOJ) Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP). The new data enabled us to examine the extent to which the trend toward youth confinement reduction nationwide and in the nine comeback states continued beyond 2010.

Top Headlines 12/13

Juvenile Justice

Maine Advisory Group Grants $150,000 to Expand Youth Programs.

Probation for Teen Who Killed Four in DUI Accident. Education

South Carolina Advocates Oppose Giving Letter Grades to Teachers. California Democrats Want More Funds for Education. Child Welfare

Thousands of Ignored Child Abuse Allegations Linger in Arizona. New Child Protection Bills go to Pennsylvania Governor’s Desk.

San Jose Charter School Helps Salvage Lives

From San Jose Mercury News / (MCT)

SAN JOSE -- After they veer off course, many of California's hundreds of thousands of dropouts end up unemployed, on the streets, in jail and worse. For those young people who are lucky and determined enough, the San Jose Conservation Corps Charter School has helped them get back on track. Nearly all its 500 students had dropped out of high school. More than half have been arrested or jailed. But about 70 percent emerge from the Conservation Corps with a high school diploma, as well as job skills and often a job.

Top Headlines 11/21

Juvenile Justice

Op-Ed: Some kids deserve adult punishment. Three teens begin hearings in Memphis murder trial. Education

DOE teams with unions to find next generation of teachers. Texas schoolbooks unlikely to have evolution disclaimers. DOE announces finalists for “Race to the Top.”

Kids aren’t so special.

Has Education Paid Off for Black Workers?

-Full report-

Author(s): Center for Economic and Policy Research

Janelle Jones
John Schmitt

Published: June 2013

Report Intro/Brief:
"Over the past three decades, the “human capital” of the employed black workforce has increased enormously. In 1979, only one-in-ten (10.4 percent) black workers had a four-year college degree or more. By 2011, more than one in four (26.2 percent) had a college education or more. Over the same period, the share of black workers with less than a high school degree fell from almost one-third (31.6 percent) to only about one in 20 (5.3 percent). The black workforce has also grown considerably older.