Newsmakers | August 2017

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Lisa Hamilton is the new executive vice president and chief program officer of the Annie E. Casey Foundation (AECF). As the foundation’s vice president of external affairs since 2011, Hamilton has overseen its policy reform and advocacy, leadership development and organizational effectiveness — and has been responsible for establishing and maintaining national partnerships. She has also been at the helm of AECF’s nationally recognized trademark enterprise, KIDS COUNT, which provides legislators, officials and the public with vital data and policy recommendations to benefit children and families across the nation. Hamilton’s career before coming to AECF is dominated by 14 years at United Parcel Service, where she began as a tax research and planning manager, and ultimately was promoted to program director and then public affairs manager. Hamilton moved to the UPS Foundation and served as its president for more than two years before moving back to the main company and serving as vice president. Hamilton holds a bachelor’s degree in commerce from the University of Virginia and a juris doctor degree from the University of Michigan Law School. In addition to her work at AECF, she serves as board secretary and trustee for the Southern Education Foundation, a member of the Ad Council’s community and stewardship advisory committee, and on the Council on Foundation’s Public Policy Committee. In her new position at AECF, Hamilton will continue work with external affairs and oversee the foundation’s research, evaluation and programmatic activities, which includes leading AECF’s Center for Systems Innovation, the Center for Economic Opportunity and the Center for Civic Sites and Community Change.         

 


The Alfred P. Sloan Foundation has named Adam Falk, Ph.D. as its next president. Falk has been president of Williams College in Williamstown, Massachusetts, since April 2010, where he has also continued to teach and research as a professor of physics. Prior to arriving at Williams College, Falk worked as a faculty member for 16 years at Johns Hopkins University, serving as the James B. Knapp Dean of the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences, dean and vice-dean of the faculty and as a professor of physics. He has been recognized for achievements in education several times, including earning the Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellowship. He has also been the recipient of a National Young Investigator Award from the National Science Foundation. At Williams, Falk has become known for deepening the University’s commitment to student body diversity and inclusion, and campus sustainably. He has also led the effort to construct a new central library for the humanities and social sciences, scheduled to be completed in 2020. Falk’s education includes a bachelor’s degree in physics from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and a Ph.D. in physics from Harvard University. Falk succeeds the outgoing Paul L. Joskow, who has served as president of the foundation since 2008.

 


Daniel F. Wilhelm has been selected to lead the Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation (HFGF) as its eighth president, succeeding Josiah Bunting III, who lead the foundation for 12 years. HFGF supports research into reforms on the criminal and juvenile justice systems and problems surrounding the manifestation of violence in communities around the world. Wilhelm is well known for his time in executive positions at the Vera Institute of Justice, where he began work in 2001 as director of State Sentencing and Corrections Programs and worked his way up to vice president and chief program officer, a position he held for eight years before becoming a senior fellow in 2015. Prior work includes law clerk for the Hon. Frederic Block, U.S. Eastern District of New York, and as a litigation associate for Sidley & Austin, a corporate law firm. Wilhelm also worked as vice president of Fleishman-Hillard Inc early in his career. Wilhelm earned his Juris Doctor from the Northwestern University School of Law and his bachelor’s degree in foreign service and international politics from Georgetown University. In addition to his executive and law experience, Wilhelm has also worked as an advisor on justice reform strategies for leading nonprofits, such as the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. He has written on justice and legal issues while at Vera Institute and for the American Bar Association, the Federal Sentencing Reporter and the American Journal of International Law.

 


Sidney R. Hargro is the next executive director of Philanthropy Network Greater Philadelphia. Hargro has served as an executive director for almost seven years, leading the Community Foundation of South Jersey (CFSJ). Under his leadership, CFSJ increased its assets from approximately $400,000 to more than $20 million, becoming a regional philanthropic hub. At the helm of Philanthropy Network Greater Philadelphia, Hargro will oversee collaboration between nearly 150 grantmaking organizations which invest more than $500 million annually on regional and national scales. Hargro also worked as the director of workforce development at United Way of Central Ohio and as the senior officer of Strategy & Organizational learning at the Columbus Foundation. Hargro worked as an engineer at IBM for the first six years of career. He holds a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering from North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University and a master of science in mechanical engineering from Ohio State University. Hargro also attended the United Theological Seminary, earning a master of divinity in theology and community power. He currently teaches as a graduate-level lecturer in the School of Social Policy & Practice at the University of Pennsylvania and plans to continue to do so after taking his new position at the head of Philanthropy Network Greater Philadelphia. Hargro succeeds Maari Porter, who recently accepted a position with the City of Philadelphia as director of Policy and Strategic Initiatives in the Office of the Managing Director.

 


The Barr Foundation has announced the appointment of SueEllen Kroll as its new Arts & Creativity program officer. Kroll comes to the Barr Foundation from the Rhode Island Council for the Humanities (RICH), where she has worked for nearly 13 years. She most recently served as its director of Grants & Strategic Partnerships and, prior to that, its grant director. In these positions, Kroll was the manager of Rhode Island’s only competitive grants process focused specifically on the humanities. In the last three years, she became known for leading “Catalyzing Newport”, a multi-year initiative to create and sustain a collaborative program between the city of Newport and its cultural institutions focused on community development and civic engagement among vulnerable residents. Before her long tenure at RICH, Kroll worked as a special events and program assistant for the private family-oriented outdoor experience organization focused on spreading appreciation for natural areas, Preserve Rhode Island. An entrepreneur as well, she founded Atlas Bower Books in 2001, through which she helped organize community literary events and sold books to academic institutions. Kroll is a graduate of Wheaton College, earning a bachelor’s degree in English literature in 1998. She now starts her work as the Barr Foundation’s Arts & Creativity program officer at an opportune time; the year after the foundation introduced comprehensive new strategies for elevating arts and enabling creative expression in disadvantaged communities. SueEllen Kroll assumed the responsibilities of this new position effective July 27.

 


Giselle Leung has been promoted to managing director of the Global Impact Investing Network (GIIN), a nonprofit dedicated to improving the effectiveness and increasing the scale of impact investing in communities across the globe. Leung has extensive experience developing and maintaining partnerships with direct service and philanthropic organizations around the world. She first joined GIIN in 2010 as the founding manager of the network’s investors’ council. During her three years working to build the council, Leung was instrumental in bringing organizations like the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, The Kresge Foundation, Credit Suisse, International Finance Corporation (IFC) and Zurich Insurance Group into the network. Before to joining GIIN, Leung was a manager at Enterprise Solutions to Poverty, an organization which mobilizes companies in countries around the world to create business models which benefit the poor. Her career also includes work as an associate at CitiGroup, a consultant at Braun Consulting and at Cambridge Associates. She volunteered in the Peace Corps for about two and one-half years as a microenterprise development specialist in Panama, advising rural business groups and serving as a treasurer for a women’s issues development committee. Her education includes a bachelor’s degree in psychology from Harvard University, a master of international affairs in international economic policy, and an MBA in management and social enterprise from Columbia University. At GIIN, Leung will work to strengthen relationships with strategic partners and guide the network’s global field-building initiatives.