Grants Awarded for April 2010

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Daniels Fund

(303) 393-7220

http://www.danielsfund.org

• Boys & Girls Club of Cheyenne,Wyo., $15,970 for a club meal and snack program.

• Child Development Services of Wyoming, Laramie, $11,850 for a speech language pathology employment incentives program.

• Mount Carmel Youth Ranch, Powell, Wyo., $100,000 for a vocational training center project and general operating support.

• Yellowstone Recreations Foundation, Cody, Wyo., $27,000 for a winter sports youth program.

• Children First Utah, Salt Lake City, $25,000 for general support.

• Children’s Service Society of Utah, Salt Lake City, $10,000 for the Utah Parents as Teachers program.

• Salt Lake City Corp., $30,000 for YouthCity programs.

• Volunteers of America, Salt Lake City, $60,000 for homeless outreach programs.

• Matt 25 Inc., Clovis, N.M., $25,000 for after-school tutoring program.

• Acorn School for Early Childhood Development, Boulder, Colo., $15,000 for Qualistar Improvements.

• Adaptive Adventures, Evergreen, Colo., $25,000 for sports for kids program.

• Alliance for Choice in Education, Denver, $200,000 for scholarship support.

• Bright Beginnings, Denver, $90,000 for general support.

• Colorado Nonprofit Development Center, Denver, $250,000 for Get Smart Schools.

• YESS Institute, Denver, $40,000 for general support.

• Young Philanthropists Foundation, Denver, $15,000 for general support.

• Urban Peak Denver, $150,000 for general support.

• Volunteers of America, Denver, $105,000 for a homeless services program.

• Boy Scouts of America-Rocky Mountain Council, Pueblo, Colo., $45,000 for the Learning for Life program.

• Boys & Girls Club of Craig, Colo., $30,000 for general support.

• Boys & Girls Club of Larimer County, Fort Collins, Colo., $20,000 for general support.

• Child Care Connections, Colorado Springs, Colo., $25,000 for a mentoring program.

• Children’s Speech & Reading Center, Fort Collins, Colo., $4,865 to train parents of autistic children.

• Huerfano County Youth Services, Walsenburg, Colo., $20,000 for general support.

• North Routt Preschool, Clark, Colo., $8,000 for playground upgrades.

• San Miguel Mentoring Program, Telluride, Colo., $7,500 for general support.

• YouthZone, Glenwood Springs, Colo., $15,000 for Pals mentoring program.

Nord Family Fund

(440) 984-3939

http://www.nordff.org

• Cleveland Orchestra, $12,000 for educational concerts for children.

• Museum of Contemporary Art Cleveland, $25,000 for the family and school outreach initiatives.

• Northern Ohio Youth Orchestra, Oberlin, $10,000 for general support.

• Junior Achievement of Greater Cleveland, $11,825 for economic education and financial literacy programs for middle school students.

• Young Americans Center for Financial Education, Denver, $5,000 for International Towne.

• The Joshua School, Englewood, Colo., $20,000 for a new curriculum for children with autism.

• KIPP Sunshine Peak Academy, Denver, $30,000 for growth and expansion of KIPP Colorado Schools.

• Lorain County Joint Vocational School, Oberlin, Ohio, $100,000 to implement the Project Lead the Way curriculum in eight public school districts.

• Lorain Public Library, Ohio, $5,000 for the preschool summer reading program.

• Ohio Alliance for Public Charter Schools, Columbus, $10,000 for the school performance data dashboard.

• Colorado Meth Project, Broomfield, $10,000 for “Not Even Once” week in Denver.

• Emmanuel United Methodist Church, Lorain, Ohio, $5,000 for camp I.D.E.A.S. (Individually Developed Educational Activities in the Summertime).

• The Salvation Army, Lorain, Ohio, $28,000 for case worker salary support and emergency services.

• Save Our Children of Elyria, Ohio, $36,000 for its summer program.

• Vital Connections of the Midlands, Columbia, S.C., $29,000 for Children’s Garden.

The Public Welfare Foundation

(202) 965-1800

http://www.publicwelfare.org

• Center for Community Safety, Winston-Salem, N.C., $100,000 for community groups, advocacy organizations, government agencies and others in three counties to reduce racial disparities in the juvenile justice system.

• DC Lawyers for Youth, Washington, D.C., $175,000 for support to organize community groups to advocate for juvenile justice reform.

• Legal Action Center, New York, $500,000 for a national campaign on federal and state policies regarding financial assistance for people convicted of drug-related felonies.

• National Center for Youth Law, Oakland, Calif., $450,000 for reform of juvenile justice systems in Arkansas and Wyoming.

• National Juvenile Justice Network, Washington, D.C., $75,000 for planning and development of a Juvenile Justice Leadership Institute.

• Texas Public Policy Foundation, Austin, $175,000 for its Center for Effective Justice to reform the criminal and juvenile justice systems in the state.

• Vera Institute of Justice, Washington, D.C., $200,000 for its Family Justice Program to work with the Ohio Department of Youth Services.

• Georgia Budget and Policy Institute, Atlanta, $100,000 for general support.

• Mississippi Center for Justice, Jackson, $100,000 for Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program.

• South Carolina Fair Share Education Fund, Columbia, $150,000 for increased statewide organizing, to reach out to small businesses and to expand children’s health insurance and Medicaid coverage.

• Center for Community Change, Washington, D.C., $300,000 for support to promote creation of a federal jobs program and to advocate for solutions to unemployment in low-income, “racial minority” communities.

Lumina Foundation for Education

(317) 951-5300

http://www.luminafoundation.org

• Academy for Educational Development, New York, $149,300 for a planning grant for mapping data about college and success networks.

• Academy for Educational Development, New York, $667,700 for an evaluation of KnowHow2GO.

• Academy for Educational Development, New York, $56,300 for technical support of KnowHow2GO.

• Achieve, Washington, D.C., $395,700 for strengthening alignments of higher education with college- and career-readiness standards.

• Center for Law and Social Policy, Washington, D.C., $208,000 for research and briefs on federal education programs.

• Center for Nonprofit Excellence, Akron, Ohio, $104,500 for research on process and outcomes of KnowHow2GO.

• Central Indiana Corporate Partnership Foundation, Indianapolis, $100,000 for expanding access to Advanced Placement professional development for high school teachers.

• Council for Opportunity in Education, Washington, D.C., $150,000 for improving KnowHow2GO state networks.

• DonorsChoose Indiana, Chicago, $300,000 for engaging middle school teachers in KnowHow2GO campaign.

• Indiana Department of Education, Indianapolis, $100,000 for coordinating efforts to increase college access and success by engaging partners and leveraging resources.

• OMG Center for Collaborative Learning, Philadelphia, $9,100 for distributing paper entitled, “Using Data to Drive Change.”

• Scholarship America, St. Peter, Minn., $140,000 for developing a sustainable college access network in Iowa that will support advocacy and policy efforts.

• Tennessee Higher Education Commission, Nashville, $140,000 for developing a sustainable college access network in the state.

• What Kids Can Do, Providence, R.I., $99,900 for bringing student-produced research and media to the attention of local and national policymakers and stakeholders.

• What Kids Can Do, Providence, R.I., $870,000 for Lumina’s work with the KnowHow2GO campaign.

• Institute for Higher Education Policy, Washington, D.C., $604,600 for the Minority-Serving Institutions Models of Success program.

• Institute for Higher Education Policy, Washington, D.C., $1,110,600 for strengthening access and success through research, policy and improved practice.

• MDRC, New York, $1,200,000 for evaluating the implementation of the Achieving the Dream developmental education initiative.

• Scholarship America, Minneapolis, $600,000 to operate the Dreamkeepers program.

Summer of Service

(202) 606-6944

http://www.learnandserve.gov

• El Centro for the Study of Primary and Secondary Education, Tucson, Ariz., $125,000 for an environmentally-focused service-learning program for the Summer Bridge program.

• Conservation Corps North Bay, San Rafael, Calif., $70,000 for Project ReGeneration.

• Sacramento City Unified School District, Calif., $250,000 for implementing Summer of Service.

• United Way of Santa Barbara, Calif., $75,000 for Fun in the Sun.

• Southwest Youth Corps, Durango, Colo., $205,000 for implementing Summer of Service.

• Northwestern Connecticut AHEC, Middlebury, Conn., $50,000 for the integration of the YMCA Earth Service Corps and the Youth Health Service Corps.

• International Center for Innovations in Civic Participation, Washington, D.C., $297,000 for implementing Summer of Service.

• Youth Volunteer Corps of America, Shawnee Mission, Kan., $193,000 for implementing summer program for youth.

• Operation REACH, New Orleans, $200,000 for the Gulf South Summer Youth Action Camp.

• Sanford School Department, Sanford, Maine, $62,500 for Summer of Service.

• Our Community’s Children, Grand Rapids, Mich., $50,000 for The Giving Tree Program.

• North Carolina Central University, Durham, $100,000 for Summer of Service Durham!

• Paterson YMCA, Paterson, N.J., $50,000 for implementing ScienceFaction, a summer enrichment service program.

• St. John’s University, Queens, N.Y., $90,000 for Summer of Service.

• Ohio University, Athens, $75,000 for Fun and Service Together (FAST) program.

• Pittsburgh Cares, $50,000 for E-Serve: Educate, Engage and Environmental Impact.

• Youth Venture, Arlington, Va., $57,500 for the Youth Venture New Orleans (YVNO) Project.

State Farm Youth Advisory Board

http://www.statefarmyab.com

The following organizations and entities are among the 82 grantees of the State Farm Youth Advisory Board, which funds youth-led service-learning projects. Each project addresses one of five social issues: drivers’ safety, financial literacy, access to higher education, disaster preparedness, and environmental responsibility.

• Anchorage School District, Alaska, $86,825.

• Auburn University, Auburn, Ala., $58,000.

• Better World For Children Corp., Tallahassee, Fla., $64,000.

• Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Fort Worth, Texas, $25,000.

• Brandon St. Community Foundation, Toronto, Ontario, $53,312.

• Chambersburg Area School District, Pa., $29,143.

• City of Longmont Recreational Services, Colo., $26,940.

• Common Cents New York, $64,064.

• Community Action Partnership of Sonoma County, Santa Rosa, Calif., $44,236.

• Delaware Adolescent Program, Wilmington, $25,235.

• Desert View Youth Impact, El Paso, Texas, $60,000.

• Duke University, Durham, N.C., $48,937.

• Fond Du Lac High School, Wis., $47,613.

• Frontier Academy, Greeley, Colo., $92,280.

• Georgia 4-H Club Foundation Cooperative Extension, Athens, $30,000.

• Georgia 4-H Club Foundation Cooperative Extension, Athens, $75,000.

• Girls, Inc., Washington, D.C., $40,510.

• GivingPoint, Atlanta, $60,300.

• Habitat for Humanity of Metro Denver, $84,650.

• Hippodrome Improvisational Teen Theatre (HITT), Gainesville, Fla., $76,198.

• Hogan Preparatory Academy, Kansas City, Mo., $33,900.

• Inside the Outdoors Foundation, Costa Mesa, Calif., $51,867.

• Junior Achievement of San Diego & Imperial Counties, Calif., $53,984.

• Junior Achievement of South Dakota, Sioux Falls, $25,000.

• Junior Achievement of the Upper Midwest, Maplewood, Minn., $75,792.

• Lowell Scott Middle School, Boise, Idaho, $38,398.

• Lutheran Family and Children’s Services of Missouri, $25,875.

• Mason City Youth Task Force, Iowa, $77,723.

• Mercer County Community College, West Windsor, N.J., $38,517.

• National Youth Leadership Council, St. Paul, Minn., $100,000.

• North American Family Institute (NAFI), Peabody, Mass., $49,196.

• The Reduce the Juice Project, Newmarket, Ontario, $58,135.

• Young Men’s Christian Association of Metropolitan Milwaukee, $47,338.

• Youth Co-op, Miami, $30,000.

• Youth Ministries for Peace and Justice, Bronx, N.Y., $25,000.