Awards for July-August 2007

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U.S. Rep. Keith Ellison (D-Minn.) congratulates Greg Cendana.

Photo: Ralph Alswang

Campus Progress

For: College students who have shown a successful and creative approach to student activism, advocacy and journalism on behalf of the Campus Progress program.

By: Campus Progress, part of the Center for American Progress

Winners Include: Student Representatives of the Year – Sarah Baird of Centre College in Danville, Ky., for organizing the largest Campus Progress event in the South, and Greg Cendana of UCLA for his work on making college more affordable; Best Publication – Jaded, of the University of California at Irvine; Student Issue Campaign of the Year – Hooman Hedayati of the University of Texas for the “University of Texas Death Penalty Spring Break,” an anti-death penalty campaign conducted during spring break.

Contact: (202) 682-1611,

Coalition for Juvenile Justice

For: Young adults, Coalition for Juvenile Justice members and state juvenile justice specialists who contribute to the well-being of children, youth, families and communities.

By: Coalition for Juvenile Justice

Winners: National Spirit of Youth Award – Keanalu Chartrand, Hilo, Hawaii, for overcoming a troubled past to pursue a career in counseling at-risk youth; A.L. Carlisle Child Advocacy Award – John Dewese, retired area supervisor of the South Carolina Juvenile Justice Advisory Council, for his contributions during more than 30 years of service; Tony Gobar Outstanding National Juvenile Justice Specialist Award – Larry Carter, assistant director at the Department of Juvenile Justice Services, Clark County, Nev., for many contributions throughout his career, including the implementation of programs for girls and the adoption of a statewide policy on underage drinking.

Contact: (202) 467-0864,

Casey Medals for Meritorious Journalism

For: Reporting and photojournalism on youth issues in magazines, newspapers and television.

By: Casey Journalism Center for Children and Families

Winners Include: Several staff writers at The Philadelphia Inquirer for “Bury Your Mistakes,” an investigative series on the Philadelphia Department of Human Services; Renée C. Byer of The Sacramento Bee for “A Mother’s Journey,” which followed a woman during the final year of her son’s battle with cancer; Douglas McGray of Los Angeles Times/West magazine for “The Invisibles,” an article documenting an underground community of illegal immigrant students in the University of California system; Izhar Harpaz, Shayla Harris and Hoda Kotb of Dateline NBC for “The Education of Ms. Groves,” about the impact of dedicated teachers on underprivileged students.

Contact: (301) 699-5133,

National Hispanic Heritage Youth Awards

For: The country’s top Latino high school graduates, who receive college grants for their work in eight categories.

By: Hispanic Heritage Foundation

Winners: Nicolas Frank Altemose, 18, Temecula, Calif., for academic excellence; Fabian Alejandro Poliaka, 18, Apopka, Fla., for business; Natassia Rodriguez, 17, Philadelphia, for community service; Haydee Cruz, 18, Phoenix, for education; Keone David Hon, 17, Kailua Kona, Hawaii, for engineering and mathematics; Daniel Lage, 18, Coral Gables, Fla., for health care; Christopher Stephan Oroza, 18, Coppell, Texas, for journalism; Ilona Catalina Juan, 18, Homestead, Fla., for sports.

Contact: (202) 361-9797,

Youth Courage Awards

For: LGBT youth who have demonstrated bravery in the face of discrimination, intolerance and bigotry based on gender and/or sexual orientation.

By: Colin Higgins Foundation

Winners: Ali Abbas, 19, Chicago; Ryan Bowker, 20, Rapid City, S.D.; Kiya (Mack) Morton, 20, Philadelphia; and Raquel Evita Sarasweti, 23, New York.

Contact: (415) 561-6346,

Youth Advocates of the Year

For: Young people who have made outstanding contributions to tobacco use prevention efforts.

By: Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids

Winners: Kathy Staats, 17, Greendale, Wis., for working on Madison’s smoke-free ordinance and on the Fighting Against Corporate Tobacco effort; Jolie Yang, 17, Centerville, Ohio, for traveling to Taiwan to educate elementary and high school students about the dangers of smoking and helping to pass the Smoke-Free Ohio ballot initiative; Kyle Peavey, 16, Trenton, Ohio, for working on state and national tobacco legislation; Anna Butler, 17, Matthews, N.C., for working to pass a local smoke-free ordinance and creating a Teens Against Tobacco Use Club at her high school; Kristy Ordoñez, 15, Ardmore, Okla., for making her school campus smoke-free and advocating city ordinances to require smoke-free public places; “Question Why,” a peer-to-peer educational group in Durham, N.C.

Contact: (202) 296-5469,

Awards Available

For: Activists ages 16 to 30.


Deadline: Oct. 1

Contact: (866) 662-4549,,

For: Nonprofits that run innovative programs that have made a difference in people’s lives. First-place prize is $35,000, with two runners-up receiving $7,500 and $5,000.

By: Peter F. Drucker and Masatushi Ito Graduate School of Management at Claremont Graduate University, Claremont, Calif.

Deadline: Aug. 13

Contact: (909) 621-8000,